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11-29-16 Education in the News

Philadelphia Inquirer--Feds give states more time to bolster struggling schools

WASHINGTON (AP) - States will have more time to identify failing schools as part of new Obama administration rules aimed at supporting troubled public schools and students who are struggling.

The rules, released Monday, provide a broad framework for states as they design new accountability systems to evaluate schools, to improve ones that aren't adequately educating students and to narrow achievement gaps. It's a key part of the bipartisan education law passed almost one year ago and signed into law by President Barack Obama to replace the widely criticized No Child Left Behind Act.

Under the law, states may design accountability systems that consider measures beyond test scores and high school graduation rates. They may decide how much weight to give to each of those indicators of success - and others such as school climate, advanced coursework and chronic absenteeism - as long as they measure the performance of all students, including "sub-groups of students" such as racial minorities, children from low-income families, and special education students.

http://www.philly.com/philly/education/20161128_ap_72f5823cf1ff48f093132561ef59570e.html

Press of Atlantic City--US students lag peers in East Asia, Russia in math, science

WASHINGTON (AP) In a globally competitive world, American students have strides to make when it comes to math and science, where they lag behind a solid block of East Asian countries as well as Russia and Kazakhstan.

Eighth graders in the United States improved their scores in math over the last four years on the global exam. Scores for science, however, were flat. In fourth grade, scores were unchanged in the math and science tests, according to results released Tuesday.

"The results do suggest a leveling out in the most recent cycle," said Ina Mullis, an executive director of the TIMSS & PIRLS International Study Center at Boston College, where researchers helped coordinate staff to administer the assessments. "One always prefers to see improvement, but holding ones' own is preferable to declining."

http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/politics/wire/us-students-lag-peers-in-east-asia-russia-in-math/article_ffb5f588-ee16-5116-b300-fac133257fec.html

By JENNIFER C. KERR Associated Press| November 30, 2016